John F. Allen


Invited lectures, research seminars and conference presentations


Summary: More than 300 presentations, in 25 countries and 4 continents, of which 24 are named or plenary lectures


2019

12 November. Redox switches and evolutionary transitions. 1st International Redox Symposium: The Origin and Beyond. Sky 31 Convention, Lotte World Tower, Songpa, Seoul, Korea.

18 October. Why have chloroplasts and mitochondria retained genomes?. Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA.

16 October. Why have chloroplasts and mitochondria retained genomes?. 2019 Beach Distinguished Lecture, Department of Biochemistry, Purdue University, Indiana, USA.

15 October. Oxygen – breath of life out of water, light and thin air. 2019 Beach Distinguished Lecture, Department of Biochemistry, Purdue University, Indiana, USA.

9 September. Nitrogenase inhibition limited oxygenation of Earth’s Proterozoic atmosphere. Poster at Royal Society Discussion Meeting The origin and rise of complex life: integrating models, geochemical and palaeontological data. London, UK.

24-25 July. Nitrogenase inhibition limited oxygenation of Earth’s Proterozoic atmosphere. Poster at Gordon Research Conference on Photosynthesis, Newry, Maine, USA.

16 July. Queen Square Advances in Mitochondrial Medicine 2019. Participant. University College London, UK.

19 June. Earth’s Boring Billion. Why so little oxygen, and why so long?. CLOE Symposium on Photosynthesis. University College London, UK.

13 March. On the constant internal environment of nascent living cells. Redox homeostasis in the emergence of life. COST Action CA17120 Chemobrionics 30/80 Meeting | Alkaline vents 30th, Mike Russell's 80th. Granada Science Park, Granada, Spain.

7 February. Earth’s Boring Billion. Why so little oxygen, and why so long?. UCL/Birkbeck Astrobiology and Planetary Exploration (APEX) Meeting. University College London, UK.

2018

8 August. Two-component redox regulatory control in the origins of oxygen evolution, cyanobacteria, and chloroplasts. Plenary Lecture at the 16th International Symposium on Phototrophic Prokaryotes, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

11 July. The function of genomes in bioenergetic organelles. Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution (SMBE) Symposium Linking the mitochondrial genotype to phenotype: a complex endeavour. Yokohama, Japan.

2017

22 September. Research questions, hypotheses, and cell evolution. Graduate Workshop on Scientific Writing, Centre for Organismal Studies, University of Heidelberg, Germany.

22 September. Why do chloroplasts and mitochondria contain DNA?. Research Seminar, Centre for Organismal Studies, University of Heidelberg, Germany.

3 September. In the beginning was redox control. Why mitochondria contain DNA and how we look after it. Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution (SMBE) Satellite Meeting Mitochondrial Genomics and Evolution, Ein Gedi, Israel.

14 July. Why chloroplasts and mitochondria contain DNA. Photosynthesis Group Seminar, Imperial College London, UK.

28 June. Why do chloroplasts and mitochondria contain DNA?. Biologisches Kolloquium, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany.

13 April. Why chloroplasts and mitochondria retain their own genomes and genetic systems: Co-location for Redox Regulation of gene expression. Centre of New Technologies, University of Warsaw, Poland.

26 January. Stromatolites and the origin of oxygenic photosynthesis. UCL/Birkbeck Astrobiology and Planetary Exploration (APEX) Meeting. University College London, UK.

2016

1 December. Why chloroplasts and mitochondria retain their own genomes and genetic systems: co-location for redox regulation of gene expression. Research Seminar, Institute of Molecular Evolution, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf, Germany.

30 November. Mitochondria, ageing and separate sexes. Mini Symposium. Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf, Germany.

13 September. Why chloroplasts and mitochondria retain their own genomes and genetic systems: co-location for redox regulation of gene expression. Plenary Lecture at the 13th International Colloquium on Endocytobiology and Symbiosis. Kyoto, Japan.

9 September. Mitochondria, ageing and separate sexes. Research Seminar. Kyoto University, Japan.

8 September. Mitochondria, ageing and separate sexes. Research Seminar, Chiba University, Japan.

13 August. Redox control of thylakoid protein phosphorylation and reaction centre gene transcription. Molecular recognition redistributes mobile light-harvesting antennae and adjusts the stoichiometry of photosystems I and II. Plenary Lecture at Photosynthetic and Respiratory complexes: from structure to function. Verviers, Belgium.

8 August. Properties of a conserved two-component transcriptional redox regulatory system in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. Implications for the origin and evolutionary trajectory of oxygenic photosynthesis. The 17th International Congress on Photosynthesis Research. Maastricht, The Netherlands.

4 August. Redox control of chloroplast protein phosphorylation and reaction centre gene transcription. Regulatory coupling between photosynthetic electron transport and gene expression. Photosynthetic Electron and Proton Transport in Plants and Algae; operation, regulation and function. Arnhem, The Netherlands.

30 May. Mitochondria, ageing and separate sexes. Institute of Cell Biology, University of Bern, Switzerland.

4 May. Energy, ageing, fidelity and sex. Oocyte mitochondrial DNA as a protected genetic template. Instituto de Neurobiología Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Juriquilla, Mexico.

3 May. Regulation of photosynthesis. Control of chloroplast DNA transcription and membrane protein phosphorylation. Departamento de Bioquímica, CINVESTAV, Mexico City, Mexico.

29 April. Energy, ageing, fidelity and sex. Oocyte mitochondrial DNA as a protected genetic template. Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, Mexico.

28 April. Why chloroplasts and mitochondria retain their own genomes and genetic systems. Fisiología Biofísica y Neurociencias, CINVESTAV, Mexico City, Mexico.

27 April. A redox switch hypothesis for the evolutionary origin of oxygenic photosynthesis. Instituto de Ecología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico City, Mexico

16-20 April. Why have organelles retained genomes?. Poster at the 79th Harden Conference Oxygen evolution and reduction – common principles, Innsbruck, Austria.

28-29 January. Participant, Royal Society Discussion Meeting The new bacteriology, London, UK.

2015

21-26 September. Evolution of two light reactions. Cooperation and inter-dependency in photosynthesis, science, and society. International Meeting Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability – 2015. Crete, Greece.

10-11 September. Plastid Preview 2015. Session chair. University of Essex, Colchester, U.K.

2-4 September. The evolutionary origin of oxygenic photosynthesis. Astrobiology Society of Britain (ASB6). Centre for Planetary Sciences at UCL/Birkbeck, London, UK.

28-29 August. Why do we need two sexes? European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) Workshop Trentennial Edition Gender related health factors: biological mechanisms and lifestyle factors. Capri, Italy.

15-19 June. On The Evolutionary Origin of Oxygenic Photosynthesis. Astrobiology Science Conference 2015 (AbSciCon2015) Habitability, Habitable Worlds, and Life. Chicago, Illinois, USA.

30 March-2 April. Anoxygenic photosynthesis and the Archaean world. Society for General Microbiology Symposium The Building Blocks of Microbial Evolution. International Conference Centre, Birmingham, UK.

24 March. A redox switch hypothesis for the evolutionary origin of oxygenic photosynthesis. Iron-Sulfur Proteins Meeting. MRC National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London, UK.

23 January. Anoxygenic Photosynthesis and the Archaean World and Oxygenic Photosynthesis –– Water as Fuel. University College London, UK.

2014

28-29 October. Redox and proton-motive homeostasis. 2nd Conference of Network of Researchers on Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Cellular Ancestor. University of Leeds, UK.

16-17 October. Why keep genomes?. National Academy of Sciences’ Sackler Colloquium co-sponsored with the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. Symbioses Becoming Permanent: the Origins and Evolutionary Trajectories of Organelles. Beckman Center, Irvine, California, USA.

14 October. Geobiology Research Seminar. Accidents and eons. How coincidence and free oxygen changed the World forever . Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA.

9-11 October. Mitochondrial genome function and maternal inheritance. Session The Oocyte. Tecnobios Procreazione Symposium 2014. Rome, Italy.

17-18 September. Plastid Preview 2014. Session chair. University of Kent, Canterbury, UK.

30 May. The redox switch hypothesis for the first cyanobacterium – and for the advent of free molecular oxygen. Physics Across Disciplines Colloquium. School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, UK.

31 January. Two lectures in Energy and Evolution. University College London, UK.

2013

11 December. Research Seminar. The mitochondrial origin of separate sexes. Institute of Molecular Evolution, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf, Germany.

10 December. Research Seminar. A redox switch hypothesis for the origin of cyanobacteria. Leibniz-Institut DSMZ-Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH. Braunschweig, Germany.

4 December. Division of Life Sciences Open Day Research Presentation. Research Questions, Cell Evolution, Mitochondria and Sex. University College London, UK.

8 November. Two Part II lectures. Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, UK.

6 November. Accidents and aeons. How coincidence and free oxygen changed the World forever. School of Science Seminar, University of Greenwich, UK.

9-10 September. Plastid Preview 2013. Session chair. University of Greenwich, UK.

5-6 September. “Coupling between information processing and redox chemistry. Cellular co-location of energy transduction with genome function”. International Conference on Horizontal Gene Transfer and the Last Universal Common Ancestor. The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK.

25 June. “Why do chloroplasts and mitochondria carry DNA?” Biologisches Kolloquium, Fachbereich Biologie/Chemie. Universität Osnabrück, Germany.

29 April. Accidents and aeons. How coincidence and free oxygen changed the World forever. Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, UK.

18 April. Joint UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment/Institute of Zoology Away Day. Energy, fidelity, ageing, sex. Oocyte mitochondria are quiescent genetic templates. Mappin Pavilion, London Zoo, London, UK.

11 April. Energy, fidelity and sex. Oocyte mitochondria are quiescent genetic templates. Conference Bioenergetics in mitochondria, bacteria and chloroplasts of the Biochemical Society and the Max Planck Institute for Biophysics. Schloss Rauischholzhausen, Ebsdorfergrund, Germany.

10-13 April. Transcriptional control of photosynthetic genes by Chloroplast Sensor Kinase and Histidine Kinase 2 two-component systems. Poster at Bioenergetics in mitochondria, bacteria and chloroplasts of the Biochemical Society and the Max Planck Institute for Biophysics. Schloss Rauischholzhausen, Ebsdorfergrund, Germany.

19 March. Plenary Lecture of the School of Life Sciences Postgraduate Symposium 2013. Research Questions, Cell Evolution, Mitochondria and Sex. University of Warwick, UK.

18 January. Two lectures in Energy and Evolution. Anoxygenic Photosynthesis And the Archaean World and Oxygenic Photosynthesis - Water As Fuel. University College London, UK.

2012

14-15 November. Accidents and aeons • Free oxygen and fixed nitrogen in the origins of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. The Royal Society Kavli Discussion Meeting Bioenergetics and the major evolutionary transitions. Session Chairman and Co-organiser with Nick Lane, William Martin, John A. Raven. The Kavli Royal Society International Centre, Chicheley Hall, Buckinghamshire, UK.

12-13 November. Energy, fidelity and sex. Oocyte mitochondrial DNA as a protected genetic template. The Royal Society Discussion Meeting Energy transduction and genome function - an evolutionary synthesis. Session Chairman and Meeting Co-organiser with Nick Lane, William Martin, John A. Raven. The Royal Society, London, UK.

26 October. Two Part II lectures. Photosynthesis and control of chloroplast transcription. Why are there still genes in bioenergetic organelles? Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, UK.

12 September. British Phycological Society 60th Anniversary Meeting. Photosynthesis requires cytoplasmic inheritance. The Natural History Museum, London, UK.

1 July. Society for Experimental Biology meeting. Invited lecture. Photosynthesis requires cytoplasmic inheritance. Salzburg, Austria.

9 May. University College London. Genetics, Evolution and Environment and Mitochondrial Research Consortium Research Seminar Why do chloroplasts and mitochondria carry DNA?. University College London, UK.

3-4 May. Theo Murphy International Scientific Meeting. Structure and dynamics of the thylakoid membrane. Participant. The Kavli Royal Society International Centre, Chicheley Hall, Buckinghamshire, UK.

15 April. NASA Astrobiology Science Conference 2012 - AbSciCon. Lecture A genetic photoswitch in the transition from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis and in the function of chloroplast DNA. Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

21 February. Plant Biology Research Seminar Photosynthesis requires cytoplasmic inheritance. University of York, UK.

2011

29 October 2011. Two Part II lectures. Photosynthesis and control of chloroplast transcription. Why are there still genes in bioenergetic organelles? Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge, UK.

20 October. Research Seminar. Photosynthesis requires cytoplasmic inheritance. University of Leeds, UK

15 September. The Plastid Preview Lecture 2011. Photosynthesis requires cytoplasmic inheritance. Plastid Preview, Royal Holloway, University of London, UK.

31 August to 3 September. EU Marie Curie and FEBS Meeting on Plant Organellar Signalling. Photosynthesis requires cytoplasmic inheritance. Primošten, Croatia.

12 May. Division of Organisms and Environment, Research Seminar. The redox switch hypothesis for the first cyanobacterium and for the photosynthetic origin of free oxygen. Cardiff University, UK.

2010

3 December 2010. International meeting Evolution of Cooperation. Invited Lecture. Why cytoplasmic inheritance? Genes in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA

2 December 2010. Department of Biology Research Seminar. A redox switch hypothesis for the first cyanobacterium and for the photosynthetic origin of free oxygen. Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA

14 October. School of BioSciences. Research Seminar. Photosynthesis requires cytoplasmic inheritance. University of Exeter, UK.

17 June. Biologisch-Medizinischen Forschungszentrums Meeting. Future Challenges in Biological and Medical Research - Evolution, Aging and Disease. Invited plenary lecture The cost and benefit of genes in mitochondria. University of Düsseldorf, Germany.

4 March. Research Seminar in Plant Sciences. Photosynthesis requires cytoplasmic inheritance. CSK is the redox messenger. University of Oxford, UK.

2009

4 December. Invited lecture: The photosynthetic origin of free oxygen. Institut für Botanik III, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf, Germany.

27 November. The Darwin Lecture. The photosynthetic origin of free oxygen. University of Warwick, UK.

8 July. Symposium on Chlorophylls and Carotenoids in honour of Dr Alison Telfer. Participant. Imperial College, London, UK.

24 April. Anschluss an die Veranstaltung von Herrn Prof. Dr. Holzwarth. Participant. Max-Planck-Institut für Bioanorganische Chemie, Mülheim, Germany.

20 March. School of Biological and Chemical Sciences. Protein & Gene Club seminar. Six interesting samples of slime collected on 10 March 2009 from Coorong Lagoon, South Australia. Queen Mary, University of London, UK.

13 March. School of Molecular and Biomedical Science. The AAS Rudi Lemberg Lecture & The Henry Bennett Lecture in Genetics. Photosynthesis explains cytoplasmic inheritance. CoRR! The University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

11 March. School of Molecular and Biomedical Science. School Lecture. Discipline of Genetics. Genes in organelles Mitochondria, ageing, and sex - energy versus fidelity. The University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

3 March. The Rudi Lemberg Lecture. Genes in organelles. Mitochondria, ageing, and sex - energy versus fidelity. Sponsored by the Australian Academy of Sciences & The Botany Foundation. The University of Melbourne. Department of Botany, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

27 February. Research School of Biological Sciences. The Rudi Lemberg Lecture. Towards an understanding of the structural mechanism of state transitions in photosynthesis. The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

26 February. Attended, by invitation, evening lecture on climate change and dinner at the Australian Academy of Sciences, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

26 February. The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT. The Rudi Lemberg Lecture. Photosynthesis Explains Cytoplasmic Inhertitance: A novel ancestral kinase, CSK is the redox messenger. The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

24 February. Centre for Cyanobacteria and Astrobiology, School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Science. The Rudi Lemberg Lecture. The redox switch hypothesis for the first cyanobacterium: the origin of two light reactions in photosynthesis. The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

23 February. School of Biological Sciences. Old Geology Lecture Theatre, The Rudi Lemberg Lecture. Genes in Organelles. Mitochondria, ageing, and sex - energy versus fidelity. The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

18 February. School of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences. The Rudi Lemberg Lecture. Why organelle genomes? Costs and benefits of DNA in mitochondria and chloroplasts. The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

4 February. Research seminar. Genes in organelles. Mitochondria, ageing, and sex - energy versus fidelity. Royal Holloway, University of London, UK

2008

19-24 July. European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC) Invited speaker. Chloroplast Sensor Kinase - the redox messenger of organelle gene expression. Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Irish Republic.

14 July. Photosynthesis Microsymposium. Organiser, Speaker. Photosystem biogenesis explains cytoplasmic inheritance. CSK, the redox messenger. Queen Mary, University of London, UK.

28 February. English Heritage. Attended the unveiling of the blue plaque Sir Karl Popper 1902-1994 Philosopher lived here 1946-1950. 16 Burlington Rise, East Barnet, London, UK.

7 February. Thinking outside the green box. Inaugural lecture as Professor of Biochemistry, Queen Mary, University of London, UK.

2007

20 November. Research Seminar: A redox switch hypothesis for the first cyanobacterium: the origin of two light reactions in photosynthesis. University of Sussex, Falmer, UK.

12-13 September. Photosynthetic and atmospheric evolution. Poster presentation: From anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis. The redox switch hypothesis for the first cyanobacterium. Also oral and written contributions to discussions. Discussion Meeting. The Royal Society, London, UK.

28-31 July. Satellite Meeting: State Transitions. Organiser. 42 registered participants from 16 countries:- Switzerland, UK, Japan, France, Germany, Sweden, Finland, Israel, Croatia, Russia, India, Hungary, P. R. China, Greece, Poland, Czech Republic. Lecture: Introduction. A timeline. Towards a structural description of the mechanism of state transitions. Queen Mary, University of London, UK.

22-27 July. 14th International Congress of Photosynthesis. 800+ participants. Member of UK (host country) organizing committee. Organiser and chairman of session Origin and evolution of photosynthetic systems. Co-author of lecture by S. Puthiyaveetil A bacterial-type sensor kinase that couples electron transport to gene expression in chloroplasts and of one by M. J. Russell Inorganic complexes enabled the onset of life and oxygenic photosynthesis.. Two further poster presentations: Redox switches and evolutionary transitions (J. F. Allen) and Redox effects on chloroplast protein synthesis and phosphorylation (C.A. Allen). The Conference Proceedings are published by Springer, and edited by John F. Allen (Queen Mary, University of London), Elisabeth Gantt (University of Maryland), John H. Golbeck (The Pennsylvania State University) and Barry Osmond (Australian National University). Glasgow, UK.

23-24 April. How Nature uses sunlight to split water. Participant. Oral contribution to discussion. Discussion Meeting. The Royal Society, London, UK.

16 April. BBSRC Energy Town Meeting. Royal Chemical Society, London, UK.

26 March. Chemistr